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How Yoruba is Uniting the Diaspora and Saving Some from Trump

Last year, the Yoruba culture took center stage as Laolu Senbanjo’s artwork was seen in Beyonce’s Lemonade and inspired a whole new dialogue about the Yoruba pantheon from Brooklyn to Cuba to Istanbul. The Yoruba-Cuban

Last year, the Yoruba culture took center stage as Laolu Senbanjo’s artwork was seen in Beyonce’s Lemonade and inspired a whole new dialogue about the Yoruba pantheon from Brooklyn to Cuba to Istanbul. The Yoruba-Cuban twin duo Ibeyi also took over our timelines with their fierce creative Yoruba energy, with more of us chatting about them after their feature in Lemonade.

 

Lemonade brought us together on the one tradition that so visibly links all of the Black Diaspora in the West, Yoruba tradition. With millions of non-Nigerians in the Americas following the Yoruba tradition, it can not be ignored as a force to unify the Diaspora.

 

The Nigerian Naira is currently at an all-time low, which makes doing business in Nigeria very attractive. Entrepreneurs are thronging to purchase raw materials in Nigeria for creative and technological exploits, while taking advantage of the low cost of labor.

 

With growing commerce and travel between Nigeria and the US and UK, more people making pilgrimages to Osogbo every year and leaving Trump’s America to start a new life–or new business–in African countries, the value of speaking African languages can not be over emphasized.

 

The Yoruba Cultural Institute is encouraging unification and cross-continental ties by offering Yoruba language classes to children and adults in America’s blackest city, Brooklyn. Their Winter Session will begin in less than two weeks and includes group classes and individual sessions. Learn more about the classes and sign up on their website.

Modupe Al-Bashir is an Applause Africa Contributor and cultural enthusiast.
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